Clouds, Kids, Love and Soul

The mournful clouds oppress my soul. Of course, we have to presume:

A- I have a soul and B – If I have, could it be oppressed. But it’s better than saying, ‘I’m sick of the rain,’ isn’t it? I do know the sun lightens my soul, an indisputable fact. Couple this with awe-inspiring clouds and I’m happy.

I like to lay on the grass, there’s a smell, it transports you to childhood- particularly when freshly-cut. Grass fights with Susan Wright, we were twelve and if twelve-year-olds could be in love? We were. She was the school caretakers daughter and I could see her bedroom window from my bedroom window.

It was a long way away, so our romantic liaisons (if that’s what they were) consisted of switching our lights on and off. Maybe we soothed our physical absence by comforting our souls through the transference of light. Or maybe we were just two kids pissing around with light switches?

Anyway, I love to lay on the grass, watch clouds, smell bar-b-q’s, listen to the chatter of people as they wander past with no comprehension they are overheard. I hum‘Lazy Sunday’ Small Faces.

Gor blimey hello Mrs Jones
How’s old Bert’s lumbago?
(He mustn’t grumble) 😂😂

About charliecountryboy

Part-time Carpentry Assessor. writer, runner, guitarist. Curious about life and all those wonderful people in it.
This entry was posted in 1970'S, Blogging, Bradford, Freedom, Humour, Life, Love, Opinion and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

59 Responses to Clouds, Kids, Love and Soul

  1. Mrs ESTJ says:

    I love the smell of cut grass. You’re absolutely right about it reminding you of childhood. I guess that’s the first time we notice it, when playing outside with friends. Something that’s becoming rarer and rarer!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. James says:

    Nothing better than lazing on the grass. Until my hay fever kicks in. But you can take drugs for that so it’s worth the risk…

    Liked by 3 people

  3. I mowed the lawn this morning!!! 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Lovely snapshot of a memory. One of the reasons I love your blog, Charlie. Less is more. And don’t let the rain get to you: without rain, there are no rainbows.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. The Hinoeuma says:

    I don’t recall having grass fights but, I did spend time with friends playing with clover. We made necklaces and hair bands out of them. There were certain weeds that could be fashioned into little gun-like poppers. Be careful of the bees…they like clover.

    And with rain, board games with your friends.

    Don’t fret, Charlie. The sun will return. That cloud shot is awesome.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Grass fights were great we started by throwing it and progressed to shoving it down one another’s clothes and running away. I guess it was a kind of juvenile eroticism 🤪So cool, clover necklaces. I’m sure a girl made me a daisy one – once😉

      Liked by 1 person

    • Oh,and the sun is back, you must have enticed it lol. After thought – when you wore the clover necklace did the bees chase you 😂

      Like

      • The Hinoeuma says:

        Yay! Sun!

        Sometimes, yes…esp. if I was at my maternal grandmother’s farm. Her next door neighbors were bee keepers. I learned at a very young age that I was not allergic to them. They hurt like hell just the same. My grandmother would always say “Now, don’t you be mad at that bee. Once it stung you, it went off to die.” I’m in pain, my grandmother is putting tobacco on my wound and I’m feeling sorry for the bee. LOL!

        Liked by 1 person

      • It sounds idyllic but weren’t grandmothers just great, lol. You must have loved the farm 😀

        Like

      • The Hinoeuma says:

        That farm was my grounding for the first three years of my life. My parents were VERY young when I showed up and I pretty much bonded with my grandmother. I was also born on her birthday.

        At some point, my mother made the decision to put me in nursery/daycare instead of leaving me with my grandmother until REAL school. Me screaming & beating on the door of that place is one of my very earliest memories. I clearly remember the rage, the fear and the sadness.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Interesting (or not) Paula Radcliffe was born on her Gran’s birthday and they were very close. You must have been traumatised 😔 I had to leave the farm at 5 and go to school! But at 3? Taken away from a lovely existence hmm! Still, you survived 😀

        Like

      • The Hinoeuma says:

        I’m not sure who Paula is but, it is a lovely thing. I didn’t get birthday parties from parents but, I got birthday celebrations with my grandmother…home made cake, too! 🎂

        Judging by the memory, it was a huge trauma.

        I broke contact with my mother in my early 20s. I’d been around her long enough. She got pregnant on purpose to get out of the house. She had no business being a parent. Neither did my father. My paternal grandmother did a lot for me, too. In fact, for summer breaks & weekends, I was shuttled off to either grandmother…two women that survived the Great Depression.

        Like

      • What an amazing story, so tragic in one way but a lot of joy from your grandmothers. At least they had experience and integrity by the sound of it 😀

        Like

      • The Hinoeuma says:

        They had their own issues from their hard lives but, yes…lots of integrity & love.

        With the exception of my maternal GM’s first son, born in 1935 (12 years older than the rest), the rest of her kids (my mom & 4 younger brothers) and my paternal GM’s two (my dad & brother) were all of the “Me” generation of Boomers. And, they all acted like it, too. Talk about self-involved… We early Gen X types pretty much parented ourselves.

        My tragedy was shared. It’s generational. My entire grad class (1984) has retard parents.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, a tragedy in itself, so you’re self reliant through necessity rather than nurture!

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Hinoeuma says:

        Hmmm…half of my comments just disappeared… Stupid phone app.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I picked up the last one 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  6. granny1947 says:

    We need rain so badly that, when it comes, we stare in awe.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Sweet as, childhood memories 🙂.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Sana says:

    “I like to lay on the grass, there’s a smell, it transports you to childhood- particularly when freshly-cut”. So true 💜🌟

    Liked by 2 people

  9. englepip says:

    Lovely. Yes lazy days lying on the grass.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. I definitely love looking at the clouds, a good listener too. How is Susan Wright though?

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Laleh Chini says:

    Lazy day is the best day.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Carolyn Page says:

    Gorgeous memories, Charlie. I remember one boy who used to pull my hair – others said it was because he liked me!!! I’d hate to think what he may have done should he not have liked me.. 🙂
    And clouds – love clouds. I would lie on the grass on my back and watch the clouds go by. Naturally, they would change shape and rabbits, funny faces and dancers would swirl overhead.
    You’ve got me reminiscing, Charlie – Not such a bad thing to do on a lazy sunny day! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Anne says:

    Summer clouds are delightful, i miss the days i felt ok about watching them make dragons and ships and monster faces.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Great post – took me right back to 1968 – summers were better then, as was the music. I had nothing better to do than play out all day for six weeks in summer and in those days I feared no pollen! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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